Ancestor masks and aristocratic power in Roman culture by Harriet Flower

Cover of: Ancestor masks and aristocratic power in Roman culture | Harriet Flower

Published by Clarendon in Oxford .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Funeral rites and ceremonies -- Rome.,
  • Masks -- Rome.,
  • Nobility -- Rome.,
  • Elite (Social sciences) -- Rome.,
  • Power (Social sciences) -- Rome.

Edition Notes

Revision of the author"s thesis (doctoral) - University of Pennsylvania, 1993 presented under the title: Imagines Maiorum: ancestral masks as symbols of ideology and power.

Book details

StatementHarriet I. Flower.
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii,411p.,(4)p. of plates :
Number of Pages411
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22330014M
ISBN 100198150180

Download Ancestor masks and aristocratic power in Roman culture

She looks at literary sources, legal texts, epigraphy, archaeology, numismatics, and art, tracing the functional evolution of ancestor masks, from the third century BC to the sixth century AD. By putting these masks into their legal, social, and political context, Flower elucidates their central position in the media of the time and their special meaning as symbols of power Cited by: Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture - Harriet I.

Flower - Google Books In the first comprehensive study of Roman ancestor masks in English, Harriet Flower explains the reasons. The Hardcover of the Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture by Harriet I.

Flower at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or more. Due to COVID, orders may be delayed.5/5(1). Flower explains why the Roman elite commemorated politically prominent family members with wax masks worn by actors at the funerals of the deceased.

She looks at literary sources, legal texts, epigraphy, archaeology, numismatics, and art, tracing the functional evolution of ancestor masks, from the third century BC to the sixth century AD.

Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture by Harriet I. Flower and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture by Harriet I.

Flower,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(4). Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture. Oxford University Press, Print. Pris: kr. Häftad, Skickas inom vardagar.

Köp Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture av Harriet I Flower på Flower traces the functional evolution of ancestor masks, from their first attested appearance in the third century BC to their last mention in the sixth century AD, through the examination of literary sources in both prose and verse, legal texts, epigraphy, archaeology, numismatics, and art.5/5(1).

PDF | On Feb 1,Andrew Wallace-Hadrill and others published Harriet I. Flower. Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture. New York: Clarendon Press of Author: Andrew Wallace-Hadrill. Title: Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture Format: Hardcover Product dimensions: pages, X X in Shipping dimensions: pages, X X in Published: Ap Publisher: Oxford University Press Language: English.

Ancestor masks and aristocratic power in Roman culture. [Harriet I Flower] -- "In the first comprehensive study of Roman ancestor masks in English, Harriet Flower explains the reasons behind the use of wax masks in the commemoration of politically prominent family members by.

Title: Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture Format: Paperback Product dimensions: pages, X X in Shipping dimensions: pages, X X in Published: Octo Publisher: Oxford University Press Language: English. Power (Social sciences) — Rome Notes Revision of the author's thesis (doctoral--University of Pennsylvania, ) presented under the title: Imagines Maiorum: ancestral masks as symbols of ideology and power.

Roman ancestor masks are distinguished by their political function and their public use. Consequently, they can help us to understand political culture and the role of spectacle at Rome.

These broad themes have not received detailed consideration in previous discussions of the imagines (cf. The Art of Forgetting: Disgrace and Oblivion in Roman Political Culture Harriet I. Flower No preview available - Common terms and phrases. She is author of Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture and editor of The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic.4/5(1).

My book Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture (Oxford,paperback ) was the first monograph to explore the nature and influence of the Roman custom of making beeswax masks (imagines) of politicians who had held the office of aedile or higher.

My book  Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture  (Oxford,paperback ) was the first monograph to explore the nature and influence of the Roman custom of making beeswax masks (imagines) of politicians who had held the office of  aedile  or higher.

Togatus Barberini is a Roman marble sculpture from around the first-century AD that depicts a full-body figure, referred to as a togatus, holding the heads of deceased ancestors in either hand.

It is housed in the Centrale Montemartini in Rome, Italy (formerly in the Capitoline Museums). Little is known about this sculpture and who it depicts, but it is speculated to be a representation of the Dimensions: cm (65 in).

This book has been cited by the following publications. The Ethics of the Family in Seneca will be of particular interest to researchers in Roman Stoicism, imperial culture and the history of the family.

Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture. Author: Liz Gloyn. The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic examines all aspects of Roman history and civilization from to 49 BC.

The key development of the republican period was Rome's rise from a small city to a wealthy metropolis, which served as the international capital of.

Harriet I. Flower, Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture (Oxford: Oxford University Press, ). Valerie M. Hope, Death in Ancient Rome: A Source Book. Flower, H.

Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, Rose, C.B. “Forging Identity in the Roman Republic: Trojan Ancestry and Veristic Portraiture.” In Role Models in the Roman World: Identity and Assimilation, edited by Sinclair Bell and Inge Lyse Hansen, pp.

Ann Arbor. "In The Dancing Lares and the Serpent in the Garden: Religion at the Roman Street Corner, Harriet I. Flower displays a formidable grasp of historical detail and a taste for scholarly book is superbly produced and richly illustrated in color with maps and photographs."Marina Warner, New York Review of Books "Not only will this be an indispensable starting pointfor anyone working /5(5).

Roman funerary practices include the Ancient Romans' religious rituals concerning funerals, cremations, and were part of the Tradition (Latin: mos maiorum), the unwritten code from which Romans derived their social norms. Roman cemeteries were located outside the sacred boundary of its cities (pomerium).They were visited regularly with offerings of food and wine, and special.

The Artists of the Ara Pacis: The Process of Hellenization In Roman Relief Sculpture. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, Fejfer, Jane. Roman Portraits In Context. Berlin: De Gruyter, Flower, Harriet I.

Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power In Roman Culture. Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture, by Harriet I. Flower, publishedlists numerous extant Roman family trees and interconnects Etruscan genealogy, [with its stress on female ancestors], with the subsequent Roman traditions used in the memorialization and preservation of family genealogies.

Additional Resources: Roman Portrait Sculpture: The Stylistic Cycle on the Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. Cokayne, Experiencing Old Age in Ancient Rome (London: Routledge, ).

Flower, Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in the Roman Republic (Oxford: Clarendon Press, ). Gruen, Culture and National Identity in Republican Rome (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, ).

Ancient Roman funeral processions were led by professional mourners who wore masks of the recently deceased's ancestors.

But because the masks were made from wax, none survived. Recently, a. These masks, portraits of noted ancestors who had held public office or been awarded special honors, were proudly housed in the household lararium, or family shrine, along with busts made of bronze, marble, or terracotta.

In displaying these portraits so prominently in the public sphere, aristocratic families were able to celebrate their. The nobility of China was an important feature of the traditional social structure of Imperial China. While the concepts of hereditary sovereign and peerage titles and noble families were featured as early as the semi-mythical, early historical period, a settled system of nobility was established from the Zhou the subsequent millennia, this system was largely maintained in form.

lived in Rome and whose ancestors had been Romans), being a Roman was no longer simply a matter of citizenship status. They had two options: they could either surrender their uniqueness and sense of Roman identity, or develop a sub-definition of Romanness based on birth and on behaving in a particular way.

This placed “new men” like CiceroFile Size: 1MB. Death wax masks of notable ancestors were kept and displayed by the family. Aristocratic families. Masks were used at funerals so that an actor might portray the deceased ancestors in a sort of familial parade.

A reminder that one’s public image played a major role in what was a turbulent time in Roman. Batavia, also called Batauia in the city's Malay vernacular, was the capital of the Dutch East area corresponds to present-day Jakarta, a can refer to the city proper or its suburbs and hinterland, the Ommelanden, which included the much-larger area of the Residency of Batavia in the present-day Indonesian provinces of Jakarta, Banten and West Java.

Augustus' Divine Authority and Vergil's Aeneid 37 this end, Vergil traces Augustus' political position not merely to Romulus, the mythic founder of Rome, but even further back in Roman history to Aeneas, the founder of the Roman people.

It was the mythic origins of Rome and of the Roman people whichFile Size: 1MB. Toga, një veshje dalluese e Romës së lashtë, ishte një leckë afërsisht gjysmërrethore, me gjatësi midis 3,7 dhe 6,1 metra, e shtruar mbi supet dhe rreth sht ishte endur nga leshi i bardhë dhe ishte i veshur me një tunikë.

Në traditën historike romake, thuhet se ka qenë veshja e preferuar e Romulit, themeluesit të Romës; gjithashtu mendohej se ishte veshur nga të. Other articles where Ancestor worship is discussed: African religions: Ritual and religious specialists: Ancestors also serve as mediators by providing access to spiritual guidance and power.

Death is not a sufficient condition for becoming an ancestor. Only those who lived a full measure of life, cultivated moral values, and achieved social distinction attain this status. A Greek aristocrat who seized power and ruled outside the traditional constitutional framework was called a.

or "code of the elders," refers to the customs of a Roman's ancestors, which were highly respected. Romans engaged in ancestor worship, often putting busts or death masks of relatives on display.

True/False. The wars between Rome and. The 4th century BCE Greek philosopher Aristotle once wrote in his essay Politics, “If liberty and equality are chiefly to be found in democracy, they will be best attained when all persons alike share in the government to the utmost.”Regrettably for Rome, when the Etruscan king was finally ousted in BCE, the aristocratic families of the city - the patricians - seized control of the Author: Donald L.

Wasson. The society was clearly patriarchal from an early stage and would continue along those same lines through the history of the Roman Republic ( BE) and Roman Empire (27 BCE CE in the west, CE in the east).

Although there is a legend that a Trojan woman named Roma, travelling with the hero Aeneas, founded Rome, the far more popular and better-known foundation Author: Joshua J.

Mark. F or all the tales of noble poverty and leaking ancestral homes, the private wealth of Britain’s aristocracy remains phenomenal. According to .Aristocracy in Antiquity | The words 'aristocrats', 'aristocracy' and 'aristocratic values' appear in many a study of ancient history and culture.

Sometimes these terms are used with a precise meaning. More often they are casual shorthand for 'upper class', 'ruling elite' and 'high standards'.As was common in Roman society, while men had the formal power, women exerted influence behind the scenes.

It was accepted that the materfamilias was in charge of managing the household.

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